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Potato Camera Operator
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8,401 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Here are a few custom exhaust systems I've built with [FJ] member mopman93.

2.5" T-304 dual-exit 2007 Ford Fusion V6 AWD for [FJ] member NHFocus:















3" T-304 axle-back, 2004 WRX wagon.








Catless T-304 up-pipe, 2004 WRX wagon.


Some schedule-10 Inconel work: Crack repair, exhaust manifold on 1995 Mitsubishi 3000GT VR-4.














2.5" T-304 off-road pipe for [FJ] member Trailbikerider.










No pics, but did some cage work on this:


3" aluminized full system with header install and modification, 1986 Pontiac Trans-Am.


Our MIG machine:




Tried two of these things before we decided to give up on them. Not the right muffler for a cammed small-block! It sounded great but rattled relentlessly at idle. Replaced with a Dynomax Ultra-Flow.






This was challenging.




Frame modification, I|H pulling tractor.












3" T-304 axle-back, 2007 WRX STi. Don't ask about the exit, I was not thrilled about it. The customer's always right. :lol:






Seam welding, mopman's 1986 Merkur XR4Ti with Duratec swap.


2.5" dual-exit aluminized, 1995 Ford Taurus SE 3.8.




























My car: 2006 ZX4 ST, 2.3 Duratec. 2.5" T-304 flex-back.














Sound Clip:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5U1VMNgxYA

And some heavier stuff, frame repair, 1997 Ford Ranger 2.3 2WD.



FAQ:
-I weld using 316 medical-grade stainless wire on all T-304 jobs.
-Depending on the environment and condition of the metal to be welded, I use 25-35 CFH of 75/25 Argon/Helium mixture. I may try a 90/10 on the next tank for stainless work.
-I do not back-purge with MIG on stainless steel as of now. I may try it to get better results, though. I just need the money to make a separate back-purging manifold.
-I "tack-stack" all MIG-welded exhaust work. Rather than using a steady bead, I repeatedly tack-weld joints in quick succession. This allows me to maintain a puddle, weld the metal at the proper temperature, and not overheat the joint and "blow out" the edges.
-I do have plans to move to TIG welding on the next job we have, but we are not currently setup to do it. We have no welding table, and need to fix the external water cooler on our machine. I will be back-purging with TIG-welded stainless exhaust.
 

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My Race Car Has Poke and Stretch
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1,643 Posts
Love it. Looking forward to the complete build on the porsche, as well as the charge piping as well. We will all get to see your skill with a TIG weld. :)
 

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I think if you got rid of the helium and just ran straight argon, that would get rid of the issue with too much heat to run a constant bead. The only time I ever use helium is if I'm trying to weld thick metal where I need deep penetration. I mostly run straight argon at 20-30CFH with .035" wire, just a little motion like writing continuous cursive L's and just staying on the leading edge of the puddle. There's no reason you can't run a half a pipe at a time going downhill, flip it and let it cool for a few minutes, and then do the other side. Throwing that much helium at it is just overheating your puddle and making it want to over penetrate. That's why you're blowing through.

Other than that, nice welds and great work.
 

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I
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Nice work Matt, thanks for sharing.

Ditto on above. I'm able to run a solid 1-2" bead at a time on 16ga pipe using trimix. Was able to get a bit more when I was using .023 308 wire and still no problem using .035 70S mild wire. I'm only flowing 7-10CFH or so (MIG).
 

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looks like what i do....
but i make snow removal equipment and i cant take pics of that.
 
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